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Lighthouses in Oregon
The Oregon Coast is home to 9 surviving coastal lighthouses plus two prvately owned lighthouses. This tours starts north with the Tillamook Head Lighthouse & ends with the Cape Blanco Lighthouse in Southern Oregon.
- Private Lighthouses -
 

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse

Description:
Located over 1 miles off the coast, this lighthouse stands on a rock 133 feet above the ocean.

History:
Known as a great engineering feat of the late 19th century. The construction of this lighthouse took 575 days to build. After some initial worries about constructing on a rock, and with public outcry when a life was lost in the process, construction was done in secret because of the public opposition. After a long history, the light was lit for a final time in 1957. Oswald Allik, the last lighthouse keeper noted in the station log: "Farewell, Tillamook Rock Light Station" as it's final entry.

Constructed in:
1881

Open to Public:
No - but can be viewed from Ecola State Park.

Location:
1-1/4 miles off Tillamook Head
On the Northern Coast of Oregon, this lighthouse can be seen from the oceanfront towns of Seaside & Cannon Beach.

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Cape Meares Lighthouse

Description:
With a tower of only 38 feet tall, the lighthouse sits on the edge of a towering 200 ft. cliff above the ocean.

History:
The light was decommissioned by the Coast Guard in 1963, and replaced by a powerful beacon. Vandalized soon after this, the keeper's quarters had to be destroyed, and the four bullseyes from the First Order lens were stolen - three of these have since been recovered.

Constructed in:
1890

Open to Public:
Yes - open April 1-Oct. 31, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily.
Free admission.

Location:
Tillamook, Oregon
On the Northern Coast of Oregon, this lighthouse can be seen from the oceanfront towns of Seaside & Cannon Beach.

More Information:
Friends of Cape Meares Lighthouse

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Yaquina Head Lighthouse


photo courtesy of
Oregon Blue Book

Description:
Yaquina Head's rock outcropping and tower are visible for several miles along the Pacific Coast Highway. The tower is the tallest on the Oregon Coast, and is the only Oregon Lighthouse with a marble floor. It stands 162 feet above sea level, and can be seen from ocean vessels as far away as 19 miles.

History:
Still standing today, this 'first class' lighthouse was built 3 years after construction of Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, which caused it's being shut down for good (see below). Always a popular tourist attraction, when it was first built in 1873, many tourists came to visit the 92-foot tower for it's amazing height. Light was automated in 1966.

Constructed in:
1873

Open to Public:
yes - it's one of the most-visited lights on the west coast, with over 400,000 visitors each year.

Location:
Newport, Oregon
3 1/2 miles north of Yaquina Bay

More Information:
Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

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Yaquina Bay Lighthouse

Description:
Beautifully restored and filled with period furniture.

History:
This lighthouse has the distinction of being the Oregon lighthouse that has served the shortest period. With only three years of service, this lighthouse was no longer used when Yaquina Head was build 3 miles north of it's location. Because of it's short history, only one keeper and his family lived in Yaquina Bay - a Mr. Charles H. Peirce with his wife and seven of their nine children. Restored by Friends of Lincoln County, Yaquina Bays serves as lighthouse museum. The light was re-activated in 1996.

Constructed in:
1871

Open to Public:
yes - has a gift shop in the basement.

Location:
Newport, Oregon
Located in a state park at the north end of the Yaquina Bay Bridge.

More Information:
Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

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Heceta Lighthouse

Description:
One of the most beautiful lighthouses it towers 205 feet above the Pacific Oceanis and is visible for over 21 miles.

History:
Named for Portuguese explorer Don Burnos Heceta who set sail from Mexico in 1775 to explore the Northwest Coast. He identified the headland in his writings. The light station -- tower and other buildings --was built using the same architectural plans as Umpqua River light in order to save money. Lights were turned off July 20, 1963, when it became automated. Recently it has been restored, in 1996 it was opened, this time for tours and as a bed and breakfast.

Constructed in:
1894

Open to Public:
Yes

Location:
91560 Highway 101
Florence, Oregon
Open daily. (503) 547-3111

More Information:
Oregon State Parks

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Umpqua River Lighthouse

Description:
It features a beautiful revolving, octagonal, red-and-white First Order lens. The light shines 24 hours a day, but viewing is more spectacular after sunset.

History:
This lighthouse is the second on this site when the first, which was built closer to the river in 1857, was washed away by floods in 1863. In 1983, the light was in disrepair, and the Coast Guard installed an airpost beacon on the tower and made plans to remove the original lens. After an outcry from local residents, the lighthouse was repaired to it's normal function.

Constructed in:
1894

Open to Public:
yes - there's a viewing area along with a campsite and Lake Marie. If you would like to visit the lighthouse, take Highway 101 six miles south of Reedsport, and turn at the park signs. There are two entrances off the highway.

Location:
South of Reedsport near the Umpqua Lighthouse State Park.

More Information:
Oregon State Parks

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Cape Arago Lighthouse

Description:
With a 44 feet high tower, this lighthouse can only be viewed from a distance.

History:
Built to guide the lumber freighters through entrance of Coos Bay, this lighthouse is located on one of the most dangerous stretches of the Oregon Coast. Due to erosion, three lighthouse were built on this site. Because of high winds and other conditions, this was also the site of many shipwrecks, the most famous was the 220-foot Czarina (in 1910). This lighthouse was accessable only by boat until the completion of the bridge in 1896. Renovated by the Coast Guard in 1993.

Constructed in:
1866

Open to Public:
No - but can be viewed from Sunset Bay State Park, just south of Charleston.
Owned and operated by Coast Guard

Location:
Charleston, Oregon, south of the entrance to Coos Bay.
Located on a narrow island 100 yards from the Oregon mainland.

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Coquille River Lighthouse

Description:
Built in a Victorian Italiante style

History:
This was the last built on the Oregon coast. This lighthouse served to guide ships across the treacherous bar at the entrance to the Coquille River. Lighthouse was replaced by an automated beacon on the jetty in 1939. Restoration began in 1976 by the Oregon State Parks.

Constructed in:
1896

Open to Public:
Not the interior - the exterior can be visited up close in Bullard's Beach State Park.

Location:
Near Bandon, Oregon
Look for the entrance to Bullards Beach State Park just north of Bandon before you cross the Coquille River Bridge.

More Information:
Oregon State Parks

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Cape Blanco Lighthouse

Description:
Stretching one and a half miles off the Oregon Coast, Cape Blanco's lighthouse sits majestically on a 200 foot cliff. This is the southernmost of Oregon's lighthouses.

History:
The oldest original tower in Oregon, this was first proposed in 1864, and lit for the first time in 1870 after planning and construction. Several sections of the lens were broken in 1992, when vandals broke into the lantern room. After $20,000 in repairs, the Cape Blanco was re-opened two years later.

Constructed in:
1870 (completed)

Open to Public:
Restricted access - the gates are opened daily April 1 to October 31

Location:
Near Cape Blanco State Park, approximately four miles north of Port Orford on the Oregon Coast.

More Information:
Oregon State Parks

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- Privately Owned Lighthouses -

 

Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse

Description:
Standing 110 feet above the Pacific Ocean, this lighthouse was built as part of a private residence of Jim Gibbs.

History:
Built by Jim Gibbs, a former keeper of the f Tillamook Rock Lighthouse. The tower is a replica of the 1898 Fiddle Reef Lighthouse on Vancouver Island.

Constructed in:
1976

Open to Public:
No - it's privatedly owned and can only be viewed from mile post 166 on Oregon's Highway 101
(please respect the privacy of the owners!)

Location:
Located on the cliffs just south of Yachats.

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Port of Brookings Lighthouse

Description:
Located on the corner of a 100 foot cliff above the ocean.

History:
Built by Bill Cady, this lighthouse was added onto his private residence and lit for the first time on July 4th, 1997.

Constructed in:
1997

Open to Public:
No - it's privatedly owned but can bee easily seen from Brookings Harbor.
(please respect the privacy of the owners!)

Location:
Brookings.

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